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Oregon Clippings Karen Ballentine

Oregon Clippings

Karen Ballentine

Published October 30th 2015
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
153 pages
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 About the Book 

Have you ever wondered what life was like before the internet, cell phones, and TV? Travel back to 1899 via the LINCOLN COUNTY LEADER newspaper and find out. You may be surprised at how little people have changed. Heres a sample of the news:SomeoneMoreHave you ever wondered what life was like before the internet, cell phones, and TV? Travel back to 1899 via the LINCOLN COUNTY LEADER newspaper and find out. You may be surprised at how little people have changed. Heres a sample of the news:Someone told us that John Ofstedahl was a logger and we still think he is even if he was rolled off from a big log into the water Monday. Accidents will occur in the best of families you know. He since told some of his friends that the temperature of the waters of Depoe in winter was just right for a plunge bath.The protracted period of sunshine is ended and we are having some nice weather again. Light showers prevailed last night and as we go to press the prospect is favorable for more. Good.A slight earthquake shook things up at Tillamook Saturday. Two houses were moved ten feet and the ground was torn open for 200 yards.St. Patrick’s day passed quietly in our city, only one altercation taking place. As usual it was whiskey did it. Al Waugh made the assertion that Jack Allphin drank 138 drinks to celebrate the day. Jack denied it and a scrap would have ensued if it had not been that Sam Owen was present. He told Al he was mistaken and told also where the mistake was made in the count and this averted a bloody encounter and the consequent breaking of an old friendship.C.E. Hawkins and Old Man Leader went to Chitwood Saturday to angle for the festive trout. Quite a number were led out during the day. The water was cold but each wore gum boots and did not get wet––until they fell down. ‘Twas hard to breathe properly and Hawkins almost burst before he stopped drawing in his breath.Four happy Dawsonites passed through Skagway recently with a canvas sack of Yukon gold that weighed 100 pounds dead weight, and which came from French gulch diggings on Eldorado creek. They are all Canadian citizens and first came to Alaska during the popular Klondike rush of December 1897.A billboard before a church in Paisley, Scotland, contains this announcement: “Only short sermons delivered here. Excellent music. This is the place to save your soul and be happy. Walk in.”One is forcibly impressed by the number of blind men seen about the streets of Fez, the capitol of Morocco. It is invariably attributed to the excessive use of coffee.Bedbugs are electrocuted by a new attachment, the side rails of the bed being cut in half, with two plates inserted at the break, which form the poles of an electric circuit, lying out of connection, the pest closing the circuit as he crawls from one plate to another.The Indians of Paraguay eradicate their eyebrows and eyelashes, saying that they do not wish to look like horses.Prospectors who have arrived from Alaska bring news that there are at least 400 prospectors on the Edmonton trail between Dease lake and the Hudson’s Bay post on the Liard river, most of whom are in destitute circumstances. Many of the men are said to be suffering from scurvy and frost bites. The sick cannot receive proper medical attendance and many are dying.A couple named Newton Lord and Jennie Helper were married in an eastern Kentucky town some days ago and the editor of the local paper was almost clubbed to death by the indignant groom because he made use of the heading, “Lord–Helper.”An exchange says that an old church member died, of whose goodness there was some doubt, but who was regarded as a pillar by the pastor, who posted on the church window a notice in these words: “Brother Johnson departed for heaven at 4:30 this a.m.,” and announced the funeral. Underneath this someone tacked a telegraph blank with these words: “Heaven, 9:40 p.m.